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None-White Women

The parental instinct and the curfew are designed to protect children and young adults from things that can happen anytime of the day but to which kids and teens are particularly vulnerable under the cover of dark. Unfortunately, in some parts of the world ‘colored’ parents see fit to instruct their children especially their female children to come in or to stay in the house during the day light hours. They do so because they are trying to protect their children from the dangers they associate with a different type of darkness.

How many children around the world have heard at one point or another the echo of the parental instinct instructing them to be in the house before dark? As they grow up and show evidence that they have matured enough to take care of themselves, teenagers out after dark do so in the shadow of a curfew that makes sure they are in bed before the night turns into the following morning.

The parental instinct and the curfew are designed to protect children and young adults from things that can happen anytime of the day but to which kids and teens are particularly vulnerable under the cover of dark. Unfortunately, in some parts of the world ‘colored’ parents see fit to instruct their children especially their female children to come in or to stay in the house during the day light hours. They do so because they are trying to protect their children from the dangers they associate with a different type of darkness.


The darkness they want to protect their children from is the color of their skin. Darker skin rich in melanin is a natural shield and protection from the sun’s ultraviolet rays but it offers dark skin persons no protection from a life colored by experiences based on the level or amount of melanin in their skin. Identifying social, political and economic ‘differences’ tied to dark skin as a threat to their child’s’ well-being, some parents confine their female children to the dichotomy between subordination and domination. In other words, they take drastic steps to make sure that their kid’s ‘skin color’ is a leverage towards dominating difference instead of being subordinate to the social difference that colors the lives of ‘colored folks’.

queens-africa-doll-landov

In Nigeria, Barbie has some fierce — some brown — competition: Taofick Okoya, a 43-year-old entrepreneur, has created Queens of Africa dolls and Naija Princess dolls that are outselling Mattel’s classics. NPR – Kat Chow

DARK GIRLS

Instead of developing the person in and underneath the skin, some parents choose to engineer the socialization of their kids by taking measures to make sure their girl children are light enough to pass in social and economic circles closed to darker skin persons. Little thought is given to how the type of person in that lightened skin will navigate the discrimination that closes those circles to darker skin.

Essence: Black women still poorly depicted in media

Among adult dark skin women who take measures to change their appearance the desired experience of ‘sameness’ (whiteness) takes on the new and more intimate form. It manifests itself more boldly as adhering to white skin Western standards or beauty. The intimate part of this manifestation is that it reflects as much what these women want to see when they look in the mirror as it does how they want to be perceived in various social setting and situations. They do it in part for themselves.

http://jezebel.com/264396/indian-women-whiten-their-skin-fight-the-patriarchy

Indian Women Whiten Their Skin, Fight The Patriarchy

As it pertains to self-image, the question is how much if any of their sense of self is eRaced when they alter the image of themselves that they see in the mirror? How much of themselves is eRaced in the eye of the beholder does not change what stares back at them in the mirror from behind the changes to their appearance.   Like the girls made to stay in the house during day light hours these women are trapped in the dichotomy of subordination and domination that defines the categories of ‘difference’ as a negative life experience. eRacing ‘difference’ by changing their physical appearance does not in any way liberate them from subordination and domination of ‘difference’. If anything cosmetic and surgical eRacing of what makes them appear different from Western white skin women, is the surest sign that they are being completely dominated by ‘sameness’ and that they are subordinating themselves and other ‘colored’ women to a negative experience of ‘difference’. In short, they are more colored after their transformation than they were before except now the color is ‘unnatural’- fake! Unnatural and fake ‘color’ negates positive expressions and experiences of ‘difference’.

India’s Disturbing Obsession with Fair Skin

Is Miss America Too Dark-Skinned To Ever Be Crowned Miss India?

AfghanAdapts

I’m a black woman with a white husband. People assume I’m a prostitute all the time.
By Maureen Evans Arthurs

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar:
Body Shaming Black Female Athletes Is Not Just About Race

Misty Copeland Rises to Principal Dancer at American Ballet Theatre

 

China’s Demand for White Fashion Models

The article touched partly on the reason behind the demand: “The use of foreign models has been growing in China’s fashion industry, as brands jostle to be known as ‘yangqi,’ or trendy — literally ‘foreign-style’ in Mandarin Chinese. The alternative, using only Chinese models, is interpreted as making the brand come off as ‘tuqi,’ or countrified.”


Cultivating Japanese Whiteness
The ‘Whitening’ Cosmetics Boom and the Japanese Identity

Mikiko Ashikari
Clare Hall, University of Cambridge, UK
Abstract

This article examines the strong preference for light complexions observed among Japanese women. Since the late 1980s, consumption of ‘whitening’ cosmetics has remained at consistently high levels, and a ‘white’ complexion has been considered trendy and desirable in contemporary Japan. This social phenomenon should not be understood simply either as a reflection of admiration for the West, or as an expression of traditional values of female beauty in Japan. Rather, the skin tones of Japanese people are recognized and expressed as a dichotomy of ‘white’ and ‘black’, which is linked to a further dichotomy of ‘us’ and ‘them’. Through this link, the white skin becomes a symbolic physical characteristic for identifying the Japanese people. Although the white skin can be interpreted in many different ways, both good and bad, in everyday life, other meanings are often subjugated to the white skin as a symbol of Japaneseness. This article argues that the meaning of a symbol is not simply produced or reproduced but represented and authorized through the body decoration in public.

Skin Bleaching, Self-Hate, and Black Identity in Jamaica

Christopher A.D. Charles
City University of New York
University of the West Indies

This essay looks at Black identity in Jamaica. Some Jamaicans have been using skin-bleaching creams to become brown or less Black. Health officials became concerned because, increasingly, dermatologists were treating people with damaged skin because of bleaching (Daily Gleaner, 1999a).

 The evolution of beauty

beauty

“YOU CAN TOUCH MY HAIR”

Dontouch

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Curriculum Vitae

Tom L. States PhD Candidate

Fields of Interest: Political Theory, International Relations, Marxist Political Economy

Research Topic: eRacism - Conflicts of Difference

Education History: Williams College, BA Political Science; New York University, MA Politics; York University PhD Candidate

Languages: English, German

Hometown: Greenwood, Mississippi

Words of Wisdom: “IT” is what you are when you are young. Your youth mistakes certainty of the few things that you think you know for knowledge of things that it takes a life time to understand. With time and a few life experiences “IT” becomes the thing you pursue to give your life meaning. Somewhere along the way of having or getting “IT” you ask yourself, ‘Is this “IT”? Panic sets in when you realize that “IT” is your life. Fear and insecurity is that feeling you get when “IT” has not been worth a life time.

Bookshelf

Harvey, David. Justice, Nature, and the Geography of Difference. New York: Longman, 1996.

Fanon, Frantz. Black Skin White Masks. Trans. Charles Lam Markmann. New York: Grove Press. 1967.

Cancian, Francesca M. Gender Politics: Love and Power in the Private and Public Spheres. Gender and the Life Course. Ed. Alice S. Rossi. New York: Aldine, 1985.

Sand, Shlomo. The Invention of the Jewish People. New York: Verso, 2009.

Lay, Shawn. The Invisible Empire In The West: Toward a New Historical Appraisal of the Ku Klux Klan of the 1920's. Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2004.

Journal

Carothers, Thomas. Think Again: Civil Society. Foreign Policy Date, (Winter: 1999-2000).

Ober, Josiah. The original meaning of "democracy": Capacity to do things, not majority rule. Princeton/Stanford Working Papers in Classics. American Political Science Association meetings, Philadelphia, (2006).